Review: Spindle Fire by Lexa Hillyer

Series: (Spindle Fire #1)
Published by: Harper Teen
ISBN: 006244087X
ISBN 13: 9780062440891
Published: April 2017
Pages: 351
Format reviewed: eVersion
Site: Author Site
Goodreads: Book Page
Stars: Three out of Five

Crown Princess of Deluce, Aurora, has her world turned upside down when her Prince (and fiancé) is killed whilst journeying to her home so they can be wed. When given this news and that she will now be marrying another Prince, along with the news that her half-sister (her closest friend) will be sent off to a convent it’s almost too much to stand. The sisters are tight as thieves, Isabelle having lost their sight, while Aurora has no sense of touch and has lost the ability to speak. The fae stole these abilities from the sisters when they were young, but they’ve coped okay… they have a secret way to communicate and protect each other where needed. When it appears as though they’re going to lose that security, their lives collapse around them.

Rather than being sent away, Isabelle flees instead with the stable boy. Aurora tries to follow and beg her to come back, but instead loses her way, pricks her finger on a spinning wheel, and somehow winds up in seemingly another world… or is it that she’s trapped in a sleep so deep, only a certain kind of kiss can wake her?

This sounds like it’ll be a mash up of Sleeping Beauty however it is instead a nod in that general direction and otherwise a tale entirely of itself – there’s travel, there are love triangles, there are petty feuds and boring council-types who are enjoying shadow-reigning the kingdom just a little too much.

It’s always excellent to see the fae as petty, jealous types who have a fierce amount of power and aren’t hesitant to throw it every which way. Malfour and Belcour (the fae responsible for the sisters losing their senses) are interesting. Any readers who also like this type of thing should check out Juliet Marillier, who does an amazing job at capturing fae who play by their own rules, and one must be extremely canny if you want to survive the tale.

This is set to be a duology which the ending of this book shows – and there is a bit of a love triangle going in this book, which is probably one element I wasn’t overly enamoured with. While I felt the sisters themselves felt like their own, and the stable boy Gil was quite ‘his own’, that’s about where it would be left. Heath and William were just a little bit… eh, at times.

Aurora and Isabelle however, are lovely and excellent characters.